Seasonal Eats

28
Dec 2009

Which would translate to "god jul" in Swedish, with a "gott nytt år" tossed in to wish you a happy new year as well! There are a couple of reasons that our Christmas day menu--usually a hearty but simple brunch, then a casual nosh later in the day--became a vaguely smörgåsbord-influenced Scandinavian spread. The main impetus was a holiday party earlier this month. The gift I came home with at the end of the ...

06
Dec 2009

As usual, I walked into the grocery store last night not sure what we'd end up having for dinner. I was thinking "pork tenderloin" but when I got to the meat & seafood department, those big, plump Dungeness crab really caught my attention. At under $5 per pound, they were impossible to resist. Just Wednesday, I'd been talking with guests at Tom Douglas's Cookbook Social about Dungeness crab, particularly with one couple who pull up plenty of their own crab throughout ...

29
Oct 2009

'Tis the season. For a lot of things, actually.  I hear talk of comfort food and big cozy sweaters, fires in the fire place and hunkering down to watch old movies and read a good book. And with all this rain, cooling temperatures, it's also the season of wild mushrooms. I've lost track of how many times I've eaten various types of the seasonal delicacy in recent weeks, but they include a wonderful spinach salad with wild mushrooms and goat cheese ...

31
Jul 2009

While driving through McMinnville, Oregon earlier this week, a sweltering 100+ temp day, my friend pulled into a local drive-in to get a milkshake. He opted for fresh peach, his son picked raspberry, while I tried to be good and forgo the indulgence. Even when the cheery guy on the other side of the drive-in window asked if we wanted a "courtesy cone" to nibble on while we waited for the shakes to be made. Inside, I was leaping up ...

15
Jul 2009

Just around the corner, on August 23, is one of the best chef-farmer food events in town each year. This will be the 5th annual Incredible Feast, an outstanding chance to visit with  farmers you see at the weekly markets around Seattle, in a setting that's not quite as frantic as a busy market day! Each of the 30 or so participating farmers showcases one or more of their signature ingredients, cooked up into a delicious treat by the chef ...

21
Jun 2009

A quick follow-up to the previous post about my dad's grilled whole salmon recipe. Here's how it turned out for me on Friday night. Such a glorious meal! Before: Despite my notes in the recipe about the benefits of head-on salmon, as is most common the fish I bought was head-off. Still delicious, of course. And it does fit better on my classic ...

19
Jun 2009

Boy, I just experienced something of a flood. And it's not from the Seattle rain that fell this morning after a near-month dry spell. I had determined to honor my dad by sharing with you his family-famous recipe for grilled whole salmon. "I'll need a few photos to accompany this," I thought. Off to the closet, where I pulled down an album devoted to him and chose these few favorite photos. Underneath the album is an old Nordstrom box I ...

12
Jun 2009

I almost forgot that I'd contributed recipes to the June issue of Cooking Light. Some magazines, particularly the larger nationals like CL, have really long lead times for the articles. I'd turned those recipes in well over a year ago and moved on to many other things in the meantime. But when I flipped past page 87 and saw a lovely full-page photo of a lemon verbena gimlet cocktail, my first thought was "wow, that sounds good ...

09
Apr 2009

Still in a bit of a fog following a very full week in Denver last week for the IACP conference. Much as we have opportunities to get out on the town for meals and excursions, cocktails and random breaks -- it never really feels like I'm able to do justice to a city when passing through for a conference. It's the nature of the exercise, I suppose. The time we spend together at the keynote presentations (with ...

06
Jan 2009

Here truffle, truffle

The Puget Sound Business Journal featured an item recently about a new kind of cultivation coming on the scene: that of the truffle. It's no easy feat to cultivate truffles, they're still going to have some unpredictable, wild tendencies and take their time to (hopefully) flourish. But at least one 2-acre plot of recently planted hazelnut trees--whose roots were dusted with truffle spores--may well bear some handsome truffles, and a handsome income, at the Bolles Organic Farm in Monroe. Apparently they ...